Bleeding

 

Basic Principles of Handling Emergencies

 

 

●      Be calm and confident.

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●      Assess the problem at hand quickly and carefully. Act logically, gently but firmly.

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●      Reassure your child that everything will be alright, He will then cooperate better.

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●      First check whether the child is conscious and breathing. If he is not breathing, start mouth-to-mouth breathing immediately.

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●      Assess the nature and severity of the problem.

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●      Get expert medical help while you handle the immediate problem.

 

 

Management of Bleeding Skin Wounds

 

 

While playing, children often sustain injuries to different parts of their body which result in bleeding. Take the following steps:

 

●      Make the child sit or lie down, as he may feel weak.

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●      Apply direct pressure on the wound with your thumb or both thumb and fingers to stop bleeding.

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●      Preferably, place a clean pad or dressing on the wound and then put pressure over it. If regular sterile dressing is not available, a clean handkerchief may be used.

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●      Continue to maintain pressure for about 15 minutes to stop the bleeding and prevent its recurrence. You may need to do this for even longer.

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●      Raise and support the injured part of the arm or leg above the chest level (heart level). This reduces the blood flow to the injured part and bleeding from the wound.

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●      If the wound is significantly big, place a broad sterile dressing over the wound. Cover with a pad of cotton and bandage firmly in position.

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●      If the bleeding restarts after dressing the wound, do not remove the dressing. Firmly add one more dressing on top of the previous one.

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●      Take the child to your doctor or to the casualty department of the nearest hospital.

 

 

Bleeding Skin Wound With Embedded Foreign Body

 

 

If a piece of glass, metal or some foreign body is embedded in the wound, do not attempt to remove it.

Control the bleeding by pressing the area immediately above and below the foreign body and not directly over it.

Place pads of cotton wool or sterile dressing around the object till these are as high or higher than the object. Now cover and bandage.

Raise the injured part above the chest level.

 

Bleeding Nose

 

 

Picking the nose is one of the commonest causes of nose bleeds in children. Some may have it in summer season. It may also be caused by hard nose blowing or sneezing when the child is suffering from a common cold, and an injury to the nose, a foreign body in the nose, nasal polyps or sinusitis. Some blood disorders can also lead to nosebleeds, besides bleeding from other parts of the body.

 

What to Do

 

 

The nose bleed in a child may seem disproportionately serious as compared to the actual amount of blood loss. Do not get frightened; handle your child calmly.

 

Ask him to sit down with his head bent forward over a basin or a sink. Grip his nose between your thumb and fingers over the soft part of his nose just below where the bone ends and apply firm pressure to both nostrils to stop bleeding. Continue to press the nostrils for 10-20 minutes or till the bleeding stops.

 

Ask your child not to put his head back during the nose bleed because blood is then likely to drip down his throat to his stomach which may cause him to vomit later.

Ask him not to touch his nose or blow it hard for some hours or else blood clot may get disturbed and bleeding may recur.

 

If the bleeding does not stop, consult your doctor. He should also be consulted if:

 

●      your child has repeated nosebleeds

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●      he has bleeding from the mouth, skin or anywhere else besides the nose

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●      if he looks pale or ill

 

 

Nose-bleed in a child who has had a head injury requires urgent attention and investigation by your doctor.